Category Archives: Portland

February 2012 Study and Discussion Groups

OLLI-UO in Portland

Find a group that fits your interests.
The following study and discussion groups meet weekly unless otherwise specified. All members are welcome to attend these sessions. Past participation is not required. For questions, study materials or more information on these groups, please call the OLLI-UO in Portland office at 503-412-3653.

Tuesdays

The Rise of Humans: Great Scientific Debates
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

“Trying to understand our human origins has always been a fundamental part of who we are. One of the core things we want to know is how we came to be. Thousands of years ago, human civilizations developed elaborate stories to explain the origins of humans. But today, with the help of dramatic archaeological discoveries and groundbreaking advancements in technology and scientific understanding, we are closer than ever before to learning the true story.

In recent decades, paleoanthropology has exploded, bringing us closer than ever before to making sense of this controversial subject and providing us with a richer understanding of our origins. It’s also sparked continued debate among the greatest minds in the field and prompted anthropologists to revise, update, and even, in some cases, overturn ideas and theories about key issues in human evolution” (http://bit.ly/n3H5sI). [DVD discussion group]

Facilitator: Mike Ellis

Wednesdays

Great American Music: Broadway Musicals
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

“Give my regards to Broadway…Is it possible to read those lyrics, let alone hear them, without mentally filling in: Remember me to Herald Square? Have you begun to hum or sing it to yourself, with the words and notes carrying you back in time to the Broadway of George M. Cohan and the heyday of Tin Pan Alley?

“[This course is] far more than just an immersion in musical nostalgia. Professor Messenger ranges across the entire culture of which music is a part, teaching you some of the intricacies of musical composition and song construction—and how they were used to create specific effects—as well as the social and historical backdrop against which musical theater needs to be considered.” (bit.ly/brdwy).

Facilitator: Joanna Rood.

Thursdays

Extra Innings
10:30 a.m.–noon

As “third agers,” we are experiencing, for the first time in human history, thirty additional years of healthy life. This experimental discussion course will utilize emerging findings from the science of gerontology as well as gerogogy, defined as self-directed learning using life experience as a platform. This discussion course is not a life-review course. Class discussion will not only allow participants to look back on past experiences, but will encourage participants to look ahead as they travel through their third age.

Facilitator: Ken Calvin

Literati

February 2, noon–2:30 p.m.
Literati will watch the film, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1945, 110 minutes).

February 16, 1:00–2:30 p.m.
Literati will meet to discuss the book, The Tigress of Forlì by Elizabeth Lev.

  • “Wife, mother, leader, warrior. Caterina Riario Sforza was one of the most prominent women in Renaissance Italy—and one of the most vilified. In this glittering biography, Elizabeth Lev reexamines her extraordinary life and accomplishments.
  • “Raised in the court of Milan and wed at age ten to the pope’s corrupt nephew, Caterina was ensnared in Italy’s political intrigues early in life. After turbulent years in Rome’s papal court, she moved to the Romagnol province of Forlì. Following her husband’s assassination, she ruled Italy’s crossroads with iron will, martial strength, political savvy—and an icon’s fashion sense. In finally losing her lands to the Borgia family, she put up a resistance that inspired all of Europe and set the stage for her progeny—including Cosimo de’ Medici—to follow her example to greatness.
  • “A rich evocation the Renaissance, The Tigress of Forlì reveals Caterina Riario Sforza as a brilliant and fearless ruler, and a tragic but unbowed figure.” (http://amzn.to/wxKbrR).

February 23, noon–2:30 p.m.
Literati will watch a film related to the House of Medici. TBD.

Facilitator: George Davidson

Leaving a Trace: Writing About Your Life
2:30–4:30 p.m.

This group provides a friendly, supportive, and intimate setting to explore and share memories and experiences.

In this course, we will explore moving from journal writing to finding the ‘line of thought.’ We will write, share, engage in writing exercises, and have a couple of guests who have moved from journal, to memoir, to a published book.

Through this experience, I hope to share with you how to leave a lasting piece of work about your lives. We will identify ten key patterns hidden in all journals and find the story underneath the surface of recorded fact. We will learn how to play detective to your days, find the ‘thought line’ or the arc of life’s meaning in your life, and frame these stories for journal, family chronicle or memoir.

Past questions the writing group has considered are:

  • What is something that got left behind?
  • What is something you cannot deny?
  • What is something you wrote or did that you no longer understand?

Members may join this group at anytime.

Facilitator: Judi McGavin

Brown Bag Luncheons

February 7, 14, 15, 21, 22, and 28, 12:30–1:30 p.m.

Get to know your fellow OLLI-UO members at these weekly brown bag luncheons. Bring a lunch from home or order takeout from one of Old Town’s many restaurants. Lunch will be held in the OLLI-UO office, suite 148C.  Lunches are always preceded and followed by an OLLI-UO course, lecture or discussion group.  We hope to see you there!

Let it Snow, Let it Snow

We are well aware of how quickly and unexpectedly our winter weather can change here. The University of Oregon rarely closes for inclement weather. Should you hear on the radio or television that local public schools have cancelled classes, it is possible that a group leader, course manager or presenter may also need to cancel their event. Please call the OLLI office, 503-412-3653 or 800-824-2714, for the most up-to-date OLLI event information. As always, please use your best judgment as to whether you feel the roads are safe for your travel.

 

OLLI-UO in Portland Open House

Discover Lifelong Learning Day

Saturday, February 4
10:00 a.m.–3:30 p.m.

A broad sampling of classes, lectures and workshops are on the menu at “Discover Lifelong Learning,” a free, one-day introduction to the University of Oregon in Portland Osher Lifelong Learning Institute.

Register for one or all sessions, at no cost. Pre-registration is required as spaces are limited for some classes. To register, call the OLLI-UO office at 503-412-3653 or 800-824-2714. Click on the course title to register online.

10:00 a.m. The Rise of Humans: Great Scientific Debates
[DVD discussion group]

Lecture: Neandertals—Extinct or Ancestors?
Facilitator: Mike Ellis
“Follow along as scientists examine Neandertal genes to determine just how close our ties are to this primitive species, which disappeared about 30,000 years ago. What scientists found when the entire genome sequence of Neandertals was reconstructed in 2010—and what it reveals about the true fate of Neandertals—may surprise you” (http://bit.ly/n3H5sI).

11:00 a.m.–noon Chinese Culture [lecture]

Presenter: Professor Emeritus of Anthropology Philip Silverman
This lecture will provide a selective examination of China’s history and major social institutions, such as the family and religion. Silverman will examine various contradictions and conflicts of Chinese life today that make the country an inexhaustible source of fascination for some and a troubling concern for others.

Presenter Philip Silverman is an OLLI member and professor emeritus of anthropology from California State University Bakersfield.

Noon–12:50 p.m. Lunch

Participants are welcome to bring their own lunch, but refrigeration will not be provided. A catered option is available:

  • Sandwich Sack Lunch—$9.25 Your freshly made sandwich, 1oz lightly salted Kettle chips, our petite chocolate chip & Elephant shortbread cookies
  • Salad Sack Lunch—$9.95 Your delicious entrée salad, fresh baguette slice & butter, our petite chocolate chip & Elephant shortbread cookies

1:00–2:00 p.m. Popular Houses of Oregon [lecture]

Presenter: Professor of Architecture Thomas C. Hubka
For over 150 years, settlers to Oregon have constructed a range of common houses that contribute to the state’s varied residential landscapes. Professor Thomas C. Hubka will present the full range of these houses and analyze what is typical and unique about them in relation to residences from the rest of the country. Through a series of slide lectures, he will outline the major periods of housing construction and describe the dominant house types that have been built in various periods throughout Oregon, including bungalows, Capes, four-squares, early settlement houses, ranches, mobile homes, and multi-unit houses. Residences will also be interpreted according to their construction systems, design development, and family usage and history.

2:00–2:20 p.m. Coffee Break

2:30–3:30 Leaving a Trace: Writing About Your Life [workshop]

Instructor: Judi McGavin
In this introductory session to the art of memoir writing, instructor Judi McGavin will lead participants through writing exercises. This workshop is part of an ongoing memoir writing class.

Based on the instructional model, seating is limited for the DVD discussion group and writing workshop. Seating is unlimited for the two lectures.

Parking and Transportation

For information on directions and parking for the White Stag Block, please visit our website: Parking and Transportation

About OLLI-UO in Portland

OLLI-UO strives to encourage the joy of learning without the requirements of tests, grades or formal admission. College degrees or previous affiliation with the University of Oregon are not required for membership. For more information on OLLI-UO, visit our website at http://osher.uoregon.edu.

January 2012 Study and Discussion Groups

OLLI-UO in Portland

Find a group that fits your interests.
The following study and discussion groups meet weekly unless otherwise specified. Please see the winter break closure announcement below. All members are welcome to attend these sessions. Past participation is not required. For questions, study materials or more information on these groups, please call the OLLI-UO in Portland office at 503-412-3653.

Tuesdays

The Rise of Humans: Great Scientific Debates
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

“Trying to understand our human origins has always been a fundamental part of who we are. One of the core things we want to know is how we came to be. Thousands of years ago, human civilizations developed elaborate stories to explain the origins of humans. But today, with the help of dramatic archaeological discoveries and groundbreaking advancements in technology and scientific understanding, we are closer than ever before to learning the true story.

In recent decades, paleoanthropology has exploded, bringing us closer than ever before to making sense of this controversial subject and providing us with a richer understanding of our origins. It’s also sparked continued debate among the greatest minds in the field and prompted anthropologists to revise, update, and even, in some cases, overturn ideas and theories about key issues in human evolution” (http://bit.ly/n3H5sI). [DVD discussion group]

Facilitator: Mike Ellis

Wednesdays

How to Listen to and Understand Great Music
10:30 a.m.–noon

“Music, the most abstract and sublime of all the arts, is capable of transmitting an unbelievable amount of expressive, historical, and even philosophical information to us, provided that our antennas are up and pointed in the right direction.

“In this Teaching Company DVD course “you will hear and understand an entire language of unmatched beauty, genius, and power [as] Professor Greenberg takes you inside magnificent compositions by Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin, Verdi, Wagner, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Stravinsky, and more.” (http://bit.ly/mEQ6kk) [DVD discussion group]

Facilitator: Joanna Rood

Thursdays

Extra Innings
10:30 a.m.–noon

As “third agers,” we are experiencing, for the first time in human history, thirty additional years of healthy life. This experimental discussion course will utilize emerging findings from the science of gerontology as well as gerogogy, defined as self-directed learning using life experience as a platform. This discussion course is not a life-review course. Class discussion will not only allow participants to look back on past experiences, but will encourage participants to look ahead as they travel through their third age.

Facilitator: Ken Calvin

Please note: Extra Innings will not meet Thursday, January 12, due to the Portland Art Museum Docent-guided Tour.

Literati
January 5, 12 and 26, 1:00–2:30 p.m.

On January 5, Literati will discuss the crime novel, Dissolution by British author C.J. Sansom.

“Exciting and elegantly written, Dissolution is an utterly compelling first novel and a riveting portrayal of Tudor England. The year is 1537, and the country is divided between those faithful to the Catholic Church and those loyal to the king and the newly established Church of England. When a royal commissioner is brutally murdered in a monastery on the south coast of England, Thomas Cromwell, Henry VIII’s feared vicar general, summons fellow reformer Matthew Shardlake to lead the inquiry. Shardlake and his young protégé uncover evidence of sexual misconduct, embezzlement, and treason, and when two other murders are revealed, they must move quickly to prevent the killer from striking again” (http://amzn.to/szQVl5).

Following this selection will be The Devil in the White City by Eric Larson.

Facilitator: George Davidson

Leaving a Trace: Writing About Your Life
2:30–4:30 p.m.

This group provides a friendly, supportive, and intimate setting to explore and share memories and experiences.

In this course, we will explore moving from journal writing to finding the ‘line of thought.’ We will write, share, engage in writing exercises, and have a couple of guests who have moved from journal, to memoir, to a published book.

Through this experience, I hope to share with you how to leave a lasting piece of work about your lives. We will identify ten key patterns hidden in all journals and find the story underneath the surface of recorded fact. We will learn how to play detective to your days, find the ‘thought line’ or the arc of life’s meaning in your life, and frame these stories for journal, family chronicle or memoir.

Past questions the writing group has considered are:

  • What is something that got left behind?
  • What is something you cannot deny?
  • What is something you wrote or did that you no longer understand?

Members may join this group at anytime.

Facilitator: Judi McGavin

Brown Bag Luncheons

January 17, 24, 25 and 31, 12:30–1:30 p.m.

Get to know your fellow OLLI-UO members at these weekly brown bag luncheons. Bring a lunch from home or order takeout from one of Old Town’s many restaurants. Lunch will be held in the OLLI-UO office, suite 148C.  Lunches are always preceded and followed by an OLLI-UO course, lecture or discussion group.  We hope to see you there!

Let it Snow, Let it Snow

We are well aware of how quickly and unexpectedly our winter weather can change here. The University of Oregon rarely closes for inclement weather. Should you hear on the radio or television that local public schools have cancelled classes, it is possible that a group leader, course manager or presenter may also need to cancel their event. Please call the OLLI office, 503-412-3653 or 800-824-2714, for the most up-to-date OLLI event information. As always, please use your best judgment as to whether you feel the roads are safe for your travel.

 

Fine Art Prints: History and Techniques

Tuesdays, February 21–March 20, 2012
1:30–3:30 p.m.

Printmaking has been an art and craft throughout the history of Western art, yet has often been neglected in the mainstream studies of painting and drawing.  But as we will notice, most prominent artists over time have also been major printmakers.  In this richly illustrated course, we will see Durer, Rembrandt, Goya, Picasso and scores of other artists all favoring techniques suitable to their own styles.

We define a print as simply an artist’s image transferred to paper in order to make multiple impressions for distribution.  Sometimes the intent was to reproduce a painting or to illustrate a text, but more significantly to create a work of art best expressed in a printing medium. We will explain the basic techniques of printmaking: Relief (e.g. woodcut), Intaglio (e.g. etching), Planar (e.g. lithography) as we weave them and their many ramifications  into relevant social and artistic eras.

  • February 21
    Introduction; Examples of Printmaking Techniques 15th and 16th century, including Durer and others
  • February 28
    16th and 17th century, including Rembrandt and others
  • March 6
    18th and 19th century, Goya, Impressionists and others
  • March 13
    20th century, early modern
  • March 20
    20th century, Picasso, late modern and others

Instructor
Art Historian, Joan Kirsch, will teach this ten-session course. Kirsch is currently a lecturer in art history, a docent for the Portland Art Museum, and an artist of woodcuts and collage.

Registration

Registration required. Space is limited. Call 800-824-2714 to reserve your seat.

Cost

Free for OLLI-UO members.
$40.00 per person for non OLLI-UO members.

About OLLI-UO

Drawing from the rich resources of current and retired UO faculty as well as independent scholars, community experts, and peer leaders, OLLI-UO strives to create an atmosphere centered around the joy of learning without the stress of tests, grades, or admission requirements. College degrees or previous affiliation with the University of Oregon are not required for membership.

To learn more about the OLLI-UO in Portland program, current course offerings or membership, call 800-824-2714 or visit osher.uoregon.edu.

 

 

 

 

 

December 2011 Study and Discussion Groups

OLLI-UO in Portland

Find a group that fits your interests.
The following study and discussion groups meet weekly unless otherwise specified. Please see the winter break closure announcement below. All members are welcome to attend these sessions. Past participation is not required. For questions, study materials or more information on these groups, please call the OLLI-UO in Portland office at 503-412-3653.

Tuesdays

The Rise of Humans: Great Scientific Debates
December 6 and 13, 10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

The Tuesday morning DVD discussion group will begin a new Teaching Company course in December: The Rise of Humans: Great Scientific Debates.

“Trying to understand our human origins has always been a fundamental part of who we are. One of the core things we want to know is how we came to be. Thousands of years ago, human civilizations developed elaborate stories to explain the origins of humans. But today, with the help of dramatic archaeological discoveries and groundbreaking advancements in technology and scientific understanding, we are closer than ever before to learning the true story.

In recent decades, paleoanthropology has exploded, bringing us closer than ever before to making sense of this controversial subject and providing us with a richer understanding of our origins. It’s also sparked continued debate among the greatest minds in the field and prompted anthropologists to revise, update, and even, in some cases, overturn ideas and theories about key issues in human evolution” (http://bit.ly/n3H5sI). [DVD discussion group] Facilitator: Mike Ellis.

Wednesdays

How to Listen to and Understand Great Music
December 7 and 14, 10:30 a.m.–noon

“Music, the most abstract and sublime of all the arts, is capable of transmitting an unbelievable amount of expressive, historical, and even philosophical information to us, provided that our antennas are up and pointed in the right direction.

“In this Teaching Company DVD course “you will hear and understand an entire language of unmatched beauty, genius, and power [as] Professor Greenberg takes you inside magnificent compositions by Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin, Verdi, Wagner, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Stravinsky, and more.” (http://bit.ly/mEQ6kk) [DVD discussion group] Facilitator: Joanna Rood

Thursdays

Extra Innings
December 1, 8, and 15, 10:30 a.m.–noon

As “third agers,” we are experiencing, for the first time in human history, thirty additional years of healthy life. This experimental discussion course will utilize emerging findings from the science of gerontology as well as gerogogy, defined as self-directed learning using life experience as a platform. This discussion course is not a life-review course. Class discussion will not only allow participants to look back on past experiences, but will encourage participants to look ahead as they travel through their third age.
Facilitator: Ken Calvin

Literati
December 1 and 15, 1:00–2:30 p.m.

In December, Literati will read and discuss two works:

  • Franz Kafka’s 1915 novella, The Metamorphosis on December 1
  • Isabel Wilkerson’s novel, The Warmth of Other Suns on December 15

Copies of The Metamorphosis are available online to read and download for free at Proj­ect Gutenberg (www.gutenberg.org). For a hard copy of The Metamorphosis, please call the OLLI-UO office at 503-412-3653. Literati will supplement discussion with the DVD Teaching Company series, History of World Literature, taught by Purdue University Professor Grant L. Voth.
Facilitator: George Davidson.

Leaving a Trace: Writing About Your Life
December 1, 2:30–4:30 p.m.

This group provides a friendly, supportive, and intimate setting to explore and share memories and experiences.

In this course, we will explore moving from journal writing to finding the ‘line of thought.’ We will write, share, engage in writing exercises, and have a couple of guests who have moved from journal, to memoir, to a published book.

Through this experience, I hope to share with you how to leave a lasting piece of work about your lives. We will identify ten key patterns hidden in all journals and find the story underneath the surface of recorded fact. We will learn how to play detective to your days, find the ‘thought line’ or the arc of life’s meaning in your life, and frame these stories for journal, family chronicle or memoir.

  • Past questions the writing group has considered are:
  • What is something that got left behind?
  • What is something you cannot deny?
  • What is something you wrote or did that you no longer understand?

Members may join this group at anytime. Facilitator: Judi McGavin

Winter break closures

OLLI-UO in Portland will take a winter break December 21–23, however, OLLI-UO in Eugene offices will be open. The University of Oregon is closed for winter holidays December 26 and January 2. For more information on the winter break schedule, please call 800-824-2714.

History through Newspapers—The Oregon Digital Newspaper Program

Wednesday, November 16
11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Newspapers are crucial to understanding communities. The values, pace, and flavor of communities are exemplified through local news articles. For instance, how did the small community of Joseph, Oregon, experience the Stock Market Crash of 1929? Were they even affected by it?

Join University of Oregon Librarian for History, African Studies, and Medieval Studies, John Russell, for this special lecture on the Oregon Digital Newspaper Program (ODNP). ODNP is “an initiative to digitize historic Oregon newspaper content and make it freely available to the public through a keyword-searchable online database.

The initial phase of the program will concentrate on newspapers published between 1860 and 1922, with a goal of approximately 150,000 pages freely available online in the first two years (2009-2011)” (http://libweb.uoregon.edu/diglib/odnp/). Russell will approach this topic through a historic lens.

“Historic newspapers supply vital evidence of our history and culture and are used by students, scholars, historians, arts groups, businesses, urban planners, genealogists and others,” says Karen Estlund, UO Librarian and Head of ODNP. “These primary source materials provide a window into the life of local Oregon communities a century or more ago, covering early environmental preservation, industry, agriculture, urban development, Native American and race relations, the establishment of the state and more” (http://bit.ly/q31shg).

This statewide project was made possible by a $364,042 grant to the UO from the National Endowment for the Humanities and Library of Congress and matching grants totaling $145,000 from the Oregon Historic Preservation Office and Oregon Heritage Commission through the Oregon Cultural Trust.

This is a lecture not to miss; friends and family are invited. For more information and publicity materials, contact the OLLI office at 503-412-3653.

Introduction to Watercolor

Tuesdays, November 15, 22, and 29
1:30–3:30 p.m.

Join professional artist and instructor Eileen S. Kane for this introductory series into the world of watercolor. Kane, whose specialties include drawing, watercolor, painting, design, and anatomy, will use these three sessions to introduce you to the basics of watercolor. These sessions are open to members of every skill level.

Eileen S. Kane was born in Cambridge, MA and educated at Smith College (AB,’67- Zoology), Harvard University (MS,’69 and Ph.D.,’67-Anatomy) and the Pacific Northwest College of Art (BFA equivalent, ‘87-painting and drawing). She has shown her work nationally and internationally in many one-person and group shows. She has taught a variety of art classes at the grade school, college and graduate levels as well as at community art centers.

Supply List

The following materials are recommended for these sessions. If you have any questions or difficulty obtaining these items, please contact the Academic Extension office.

Watercolor paper: Cold-pressed, 140lb in pads, blocks (about 11’x14’) or individual sheets.

A kitchen plate to use as a palette.

Paints: Tubes of the following transparent watercolors:

  • Cadmium or Hansa Yellow (Cadmium Yellow “hue” will work. It’s less expensive).
  • Cadmium Red (medium): a rich, dark red (”hue” is OK).
  • Cobalt Blue or Ultramarine Blue (French Ultramarine)
  • Turquoise or Cerulean Blue
  • Hooker’s Green (Light or Dark)
  • Burnt Umber (or another rich, dark brown, eg- Raw Umber)
  • Permanent Alizarin Crimson or Rose Madder

Brushes: Please have these three short-handled brushes for the first class:

  • A large “wash” brush (at least 1.5” wide): This can be an actual watercolor wash brush (a full, round head with soft bristles) or a simple wall-painting brush (from the hardware store) that also has soft bristles. Larger cosmetic brushes also work for stretching paper and for washes.
  • A medium-sized (about 3/4” wide) flat, watercolor brush. Synthetic bristles are fine and less expensive. Winsor-Newton makes a great, clear-handled, beveled end brush.
  • A pointed watercolor brush, about 3/4”-1” in length and about 1/2” at its widest.

If you already own brushes, just bring those to the first class.

 

Open House—To Cut or Not to Cut: Censorship in Literature

Tuesday, November 8, 1:30–3:00 p.m.
University of Oregon in Portland 70 NW Couch Street

Hosted by the UO Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
and the UO Library and Learning Commons

Sponsored by Oregon Humanities Conversation Project

Recent efforts to remove the “N” word in literature—from the new edition of Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in which the word is changed to “slave” to the attempt to halt a high school production of August Wilson’s Joe Turner’s Come and Gone because of its “offensive” language—raise questions about censorship. Is censorship ever a good thing? Should accommodations be made considering the difference between a character’s and author’s point of view?

“To Cut or Not to Cut: Censorship in Literature” is the focus of a free conversation with Reed College Professor Pancho Savery. The discussion takes place on Tuesday, November 8, 2011 at 1:30 p.m. at the University of Oregon in Portland White Stag Block, 70 NW Couch Street. The conversation, sponsored by Oregon Humanities, is hosted by the University of Oregon Osher Lifelong Learning Institute in Portland and the University of Oregon Library and Learning Commons.

Savery is professor of English, humanities, and American studies at Reed College. He also teaches in Reed’s freshman humanities program on the Ancient Mediterranean World (focusing on Greece, Egypt, Persia, and Rome). For the last eleven years, he has worked with Oregon Humanities on the Humanity in Perspective program.

Through the Conversation Project, Oregon Humanities offers free programs that engage community members in thoughtful, challenging conversations about ideas critical to our daily lives and our state’s future.

Oregon Humanities (813 SW Alder St, #702; Portland, OR 97205) connects Oregonians to ideas to change lives and transform communities. More information about Oregon Humanities’ programs and publications, which include the Conversation Project, Think & Drink, Humanity in Perspective, Happy Camp, Public Program Grants, Responsive Program Grants, and Oregon Humanities magazine, can be found at oregonhumanities.org. Oregon Humanities is an independent, nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities and a partner of the Oregon Cultural Trust.

This event is free and open to the public. Invite your friends, family and neighbors to join you.

 

November 2011 Study and Discussion Groups

OLLI-UO in Portland

Find a group that fits your interests.

The following study and discussion groups meet weekly unless otherwise specified. All members are welcome to attend these sessions. Past participation is not required. For questions, study materials or more information on these groups, please call the OLLI-UO in Portland office at 503-412-3653.

Tuesdays

The Story of Human Language
10:30 a.m.–noon

“There are good reasons that language fascinates us so. It not only defines humans as a species, placing us head and shoulders above even the most proficient animal communicators, but it also beguiles us with its endless mysteries.

“How did different languages come to be? Why isn’t there just a single language? How does a language change, and when it does, is that change indicative of decay or growth? How does a language become extinct?

“Dr. John McWhorter, one of America’s leading linguists, addresses these and other questions as he takes you on an in-depth tour of the development of human language.”  (http://bit.ly/liSHAW) [DVD discussion group]

Wednesdays

How to Listen to and Understand Great Music
10:30 a.m.–noon

“Music, the most abstract and sublime of all the arts, is capable of transmitting an unbelievable amount of expressive, historical, and even philosophical information to us, provided that our antennas are up and pointed in the right direction.

“In this Teaching Company DVD course “you will hear and understand an entire language of unmatched beauty, genius, and power [as] Professor Greenberg takes you inside magnificent compositions by Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin, Verdi, Wagner, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Stravinsky, and more.” (http://bit.ly/mEQ6kk) [DVD discussion group]
Facilitator: Joanna Rood

Thursdays

Extra Innings
10:30 a.m.–noon

As “third agers,” we are experiencing, for the first time in human history, thirty additional years of healthy life. This experimental discussion course will utilize emerging findings from the science of gerontology as well as gerogogy, defined as self-directed learning using life experience as a platform. This discussion course is not a life-review course. Class discussion will not only allow participants to look back on past experiences, but will encourage participants to look ahead as they travel through their third age.
Facilitator: Ken Calvin

Literati
November 3 and 10, 1:00–2:30 p.m.

In November, Literati will read and discuss Voltaire’s French satire, Candide, ou l’Optimisme, or Candide: or, All for the Best, published in 1759.

Candide has enjoyed both great success and great scandal. Immedi­ately after its secretive publication, the book was widely banned because it contained religious blasphemy, political sedition and intellectual hostility hidden under a thin veil of naïveté. However, with its sharp wit and insightful portrayal of the human condition, the novel has since inspired many later authors and artists to mimic and adapt it” (http://bit.ly/15fSrV).

Copies of this text are available online to read and download for free at Proj­ect Gutenberg (www.gutenberg.org). For a hard copy of Candide, please call the OLLI-UO office at 503-412-3653. Literati will supplement discussion with the DVD Teaching Company series, History of World Literature, taught by Purdue University Professor Grant L. Voth.
Facilitator: George Davidson.

Leaving a Trace: Writing About Your Life
2:30–4:30 p.m.

This group provides a friendly, supportive, and intimate setting to explore and share memories and experiences.

In this course, we will explore moving from journal writing to finding the ‘line of thought.’ We will write, share, engage in writing exercises, and have a couple of guests who have moved from journal, to memoir, to a published book.

Through this experience, I hope to share with you how to leave a lasting piece of work about your lives. We will identify ten key patterns hidden in all journals and find the story underneath the surface of recorded fact. We will learn how to play detective to your days, find the ‘thought line’ or the arc of life’s meaning in your life, and frame these stories for journal, family chronicle or memoir.

Past questions the writing group has considered are:

  • What is something that got left behind?
  • What is something you cannot deny?
  • What is something you wrote or did that you no longer understand?

Members may join this group at anytime.
Facilitator: Judi McGavin

Thanksgiving holiday closure

UO offices will be closed on Thursday, November 24, and Friday, November 25, for the Thanksgiving holiday. Study and discussion groups will not meet on Thursday, November 24.

 

 

 

October 2011 Study and Discussion Groups

OLLI-UO in Portland

Find a group that fits your interests.

The following study and discussion groups meet weekly unless otherwise specified. All members are welcome to attend these sessions. Past participation is not required. For questions, study materials or more information on these groups, please call the OLLI-UO in Portland office at 503-412-3653.

Tuesdays

The Story of Human Language [DVD discussion group]
10:30 a.m.–noon

“There are good reasons that language fascinates us so. It not only defines humans as a species, placing us head and shoulders above even the most proficient animal communicators, but it also beguiles us with its endless mysteries.

“How did different languages come to be? Why isn’t there just a single language? How does a language change, and when it does, is that change indicative of decay or growth? How does a language become extinct?

“Dr. John McWhorter, one of America’s leading linguists, addresses these and other questions as he takes you on an in-depth tour of the development of human language.”  (http://bit.ly/liSHAW)

Wednesdays

How to Listen to and Understand Great Music [DVD discussion group] 
10:30 a.m.–noon

“Music, the most abstract and sublime of all the arts, is capable of transmitting an unbelievable amount of expressive, historical, and even philosophical information to us, provided that our antennas are up and pointed in the right direction.

“In this Teaching Company DVD course “you will hear and understand an entire language of unmatched beauty, genius, and power [as] Professor Greenberg takes you inside magnificent compositions by Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin, Verdi, Wagner, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Stravinsky, and more.” (http://bit.ly/mEQ6kk)
Facilitator: Joanna Rood

Thursdays

Extra Innings
Thursdays, 10:30 a.m.–noon

As “third agers,” we are experiencing, for the first time in human history, thirty additional years of healthy life. This experimental discussion course will utilize emerging findings from the science of gerontology as well as gerogogy, defined as self-directed learning using life experience as a platform. This discussion course is not a life-review course. Class discussion will not only allow participants to look back on past experiences, but will encourage participants to look ahead as they travel through their third age.

Literati
October 13 and 20, 1:00–2:30 p.m.

In October, Literati will read Wuthering Heights, Emily Brontë’s only novel. Published under the pseudonym, Ellis Bell, this Gothic novel was originally rejected by publishers until it was accepted in July 1847. Literati will supplement discussion with the DVD Teaching Company series, History of World Literature, taught by Purdue University Professor Grant L. Voth.

  • October 13 and 20: Discussion of the Gothic novel, Wuthering Heights, by Emily Brontë.

Leaving a Trace: Writing About Your Life
Thursdays, 2:30–4:30 p.m.

Led by OLLI member, Judi McGavin, this group provides a friendly, supportive, and intimate setting to explore and share memories and experiences.

“In this course, we will explore moving from journal writing to finding the ‘line of thought.’ We will write, share, engage in writing exercises, and have a couple of guests who have moved from journal, to memoir, to a published book.

“Through this experience, I hope to share with you how to leave a lasting piece of work about your lives. We will identify ten key patterns hidden in all journals and find the story underneath the surface of recorded fact. We will learn how to play detective to your days, find the ‘thought line’ or the arc of life’s meaning in your life, and frame these stories for journal, family chronicle or memoir.”

Past questions the writing group has considered are:

  • What is something that got left behind?
  • What is something you cannot deny?
  • What is something you wrote or did that you no longer understand?

Members may join this group at anytime.