Category Archives: OLLI UO

Inclement Weather Policy

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Following is the inclement weather policy for the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Oregon. Regardless of class remaining open it is always advised to use your best judgement when deciding if you should venture out into questionable weather conditions.

Central Oregon

As the temperatures plummet across the High Desert, we’d like to remind Central Oregon OLLI–UO members of our inclement weather policy. The UO Bend Center follows Bend–La Pine School District procedures. UO Bend Center events will be canceled when the Bend–La Pine School District announces weather-related closures. Cancellations will be noted on the Academic Extension webpage: academicextension.uoregon.edu and on the OLLI–UO webpage: osher. uoregon.edu

Members may call the Bend–La Pine hotline for updated weather delay or closure information at 541-323-7669.

Eugene/Springfield

During inclement weather events, information regarding delays or cancellations of OLLI sessions will follow Eugene School District 4J school procedures. 4J delays or cancellations will be announced on radio station KRVM 91.9 FM and news broadcasts from KEZI, KMTR, or KVAL. Cancellations or delays will be noted on the AE and OLLI-UO webpages as well.

UO Academic Extension staff will send out an e-mail on the following business day if OLLI-UO classes will continue to be canceled. Please check your e-mail regularly during inclement weather.

Members may alternately call the main UO Academic Extension office at 541-346-0697 for updated weather delay or closure information.

Regardless of the class schedule, use your best judgement and do not drive in dangerous conditions.

Osher Foundation Awards OLLI-UO Capacity-Building Grant

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We’re pleased to announce that the Bernard Osher Foundation has awarded a grant to our program to support projects proposed by the Councils and committee chairs of both the Central Oregon and Eugene-Springfield program sites and the OLLI-UO staff.

The grant is part of a new funding initiative recently launched by the Osher Foundation that offers an opportunity for Osher Institutes that have received a single endowment gift to apply for special one year grants.

The Osher Foundation describes the initiative as being “intended to support fundraising, membership outreach, and other activities that help to strengthen endowed Osher Institutes and enhance their fiscal health, resiliency, and ability to respond to the increasing demand for enriching educational services in their communities.”

We look forward to sharing updates on the grant initiatives over the course of the 2016–2017 academic year. And we’d like to thank the Osher Foundation for their continuing support of our lifelong learning institute.

What is OLLI UO All About?

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OLLI-UO celebrates the joy of learning, encouraging academic exploration without the pressures of grades or tests. Learners from all backgrounds and levels of education are welcome to enjoy the benefits of membership.

“The best thing about OLLI is getting together with like-minded souls, to study and talk about events, people and issues that we are all interested in.”
~ Richard Linford, OLLI UO Central Oregon member

Curriculum is member-driven and diverse; members shape programming to expand their views of the world and enrich their lives and communities.

Lectures, short courses, and ongoing study and discussion groups cover topics including the humanities, social and physical sciences, and the arts, as well as issues of local, state, national and international interest.

“When I decided to move to Eugene, it was in part because I guessed that the UO must have some sort of adult ed program tied to it, and OLLI is it!”
~ Jane Souzon, OLLI UO Eugene/Springfield member

Lectures

Offered as series or stand-alone sessions, these dynamic presentations are typically taught by university faculty, community experts, and OLLI-UO members. The lecture format is interactive, allowing for lively discussion.

Short Courses

These courses often cover topics in-depth for six to ten weeks and may encourage additional reading or preparation. Registration may be required as seating is limited. These non-credit courses are typically taught by university faculty, independent scholars, and OLLI-UO members.

“I liked the Gettysburg series best because it was “home grown”–developed and presented by four of our own OLLI members.”
~ Joe Stevens, OLLI UO Central Oregon member

Learning Circles: Study and Discussion Groups

These groups are designed to be an informal exchange of ideas in a considerate atmosphere. Study groups often incorporate instructional materials such as articles, books, and educational DVDs. Study group topics are well-defined and explored in-depth. Discussion groups are less structured, allowing for free-flowing conversation. Examples of discussion group topics include current events, science, and politics.

“The best thing about OLLI is the open conversation about politics, history, culture, etc. Such an amazing group of people.”
~ Kathy Hahn, OLLI UO Eugene/Springfield member

Most of all OLLI is a group of people who come together because they love learning.

Travel Opportunity for OLLI UO Members

parliament-building-982822_1280Have you ever wanted to take a river cruise on the Danube? What about exploring points of interest in Prague? If you’ve wanted to travel to the Czech Republic, Austria, Slovakia and Hungary but haven’t known where to start here is an opportunity for you!

Grand Circle Travel is offering a river cruise exclusively to OLLI members. OLLI UO and eight other Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes from around the country are sharing the opportunity with our members for an excursion that can take you to all of these places.

Stop in the front office or pick up a flyer in the classrooms for more information and the tour code. All registration, payment, and trip arrangements are handled by Grand Circle Travel.

 

To All OLLI-UO Members, Thank You!

Thank you OLLI UO Member Volunteers

There is a lot of work that goes into the programs that we all know and love, and a lot of it happens behind the scenes. The council and committee members of both OLLI-UO sites meet monthly to discuss and problem solve, plan and debate what is best for the program and all of you. The Program Committees track down and line up presenters and presentations, plan trips and tours; they schedule and scheme to make OLLI-UO great. The Councils invest a lot of energy and time because, like you, they love learning and the community that OLLI-UO provides.

Next, we want to recognize and acknowledge the time and efforts of OLLI members who are at the head of the class. You see them there, leading discussions, providing handouts, sharing their knowledge, and facilitating your learning experience; they prepare, days, weeks, even months in advance. Their extra efforts show, and we appreciate all that they do.

And finally, we would like to say thank you to OLLI-UO Program Director Ruth Heller. She toggles her attention seamlessly between two sites—Eugene and Bend—and works tirelessly to ensure the program is a success. If you’ve corresponded with Ruth, you know that e-mails will show up in your inbox at odd hours; there is no question of her dedication.

Our members serve on committees, facilitate classes, plan and lead field trips, present lectures, and help make OLLI-UO a vibrant program. Thank you for all that you do!

 

OLLI Interview—Randall Donohue

OLLI Interviews. Getting to know our members one question at a time.

Today we talk with OLLI UO Eugene/Springfield member Randal Donohue. Randal joined OLLI in 2013 and is currently serving on the council.

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Randall fishing with his granddaughter

Randall fishing with his granddaughter.

How did you originally hear about the OLLI program and what about it attracted you?

I heard about OLLI from fellow members of the West Cascades Peace Corps Association. I was drawn to OLLI by the members I met, by the variety of interesting post-retirement programs, and by the discussion group on International Relations in particular.

What is your background? Academic? Professional? etc.

Still a farm boy at heart, I am actually a retired university professor. My field is international business, with a focus on Asia where we lived and worked for 23 years.

What is your favorite form of recreation?

My favorite recreational activities include spending time with our granddaughter in Eugene, fishing the McKenzie River, and dancing wherever possible.

What is the proudest accomplishment in your life?

My proudest achievement is having been (apparently) a pretty good father. I base this claim on the character of our grown sons and the choices they make.  

What prompted you to come back to learning?

I believe I’ve never stopped learning, but I did retire recently from the formal world of higher education.

What is your favorite OLLI class or activity and why?

So far, my favorite OLLI activities are three: first the International Relations study group because I have something to offer there, and because of the many members who care about and pay attention to world affairs; second is the “News and Views” discussion group with its stimulating current topics and masterful facilitation; and thirdly I enjoy interacting with the friendly, professional UO/OLLI staffers.  

Have you ever/would you ever lead an OLLI class? If yes, please tell us a little about the class.

I have not yet led an OLLI class, but for the international relations group I have enjoyed sharing a series of Country Profiles, focusing so far on China, India, Indonesia, Singapore, and Current Tensions in the South China Sea.

Why do you think the program is needed in the community?

Moving back to Oregon after decades away, I have met so many interesting and talented people, now at or near retirement age, who are keen to continue learning, to continue feeling useful and to share their experience and perspectives with other ‘birds of a feather’.

What is your vision for the future of OLLI UO?

My vision for OLLI UO is to continue growing in several ways: in membership and financial sustainability; in joint ventures with community organizations; and in the quality of program activities. OLLI is a treasure. It has a great thing going, but we can never rest on our laurels!

 

Not a member of OLLI UO? Click here for membership information.

 

OLLI Interview—Larry Weinberg

OLLI Interviews, Getting to know our members one question at a time.

Our interview this week is with OLLI UO Central Oregon member Larry Weinberg. Larry joined OLLI in 2005.

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Larry on top of killamanjaro

On top of Kilimanjaro.

How did you originally hear about the OLLI program and what about it attracted you?

I recall reading about the Silver Sage program (previous name) in some publication in Bend aimed at seniors.  I wanted to keep my mind active, so I followed up on the lead when I moved to Bend in 2005.

What is your background? Academic? Professional? etc.

I taught at the University of Wyoming for several years (mathematics) and then got a Law degree.  I practices law with Montana state government for several years and then went to Boeing where I worked on military programs and then environmental affairs.

What is your favorite form of recreation?

Hiking, photography and travel.

What is the proudest accomplishment in your life?

Made it to the top of Mount Kilimanjaro – under my own power.

What prompted you to come back to learning?

Never left it.

What is your favorite OLLI class or activity and why?

I enjoy the Teaching Company-based DVD science courses, as my background is in the sciences.  The discussions are always interesting.

Have you ever/would you ever lead an OLLI class? If yes, please tell us a little about the class.

I have lead numerous classes for OLLI, including several armchair traveler talks on the trips that I have taken.  I have also put together math-related classes and facilitated several DVD courses, including one currently on Medical Grand Rounds.

Why do you think the program is needed in the community?

There are presently no real alternatives in Bend for an ongoing program like OLLI CO.  The local colleges don’t offer short courses aimed at a senior audience with widely varying interests and backgrounds.

What is your vision for the future of OLLI UO?

I would like to see OLLI CO make better use of the resources of COCC and OSU Cascades to present individual lectures and short courses.  I also believe we need some evening programs for those who are still working.

 

Not a member of OLLI UO? Click here for membership information.

OLLI UO July Book Groups Reading List

OLLI UO July Book Groups Reading List

OLLI UO Eugene/Springfield

Hitstorical and Non-fiction Book Group
Meets second and fourth Tuesdays, 10:00 a.m., UO Baker Downtown Center
Mozart’s Sister by Rita Charbonnier

Classics/Philosophy Book Group
Meets fourth Tuesdays, 1:00 p.m., UO Baker Downtown Center
The Fall by Albert Camus

OLLI UO Central Oregon

Page Turners Fiction Group
Meets second Tuesdays, 10:00 a.m., UO Bend Center
On Summer Hiatus

Non-fiction Book Group
Meets first and third Tuesdays, 10:00 a.m., UO Bend Center
On Summer Hiatus

 

Not a member of OLLI UO? Click here for membership information.

 

 

OLLI Interview–Larry Kikuta

OLLI Interviews, getting to know our members one question at a timeThis week we interview OLLI UO Eugene/Springfield member Larry Kikuta. Larry has been a member of OLLI UO since October 2011.

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OLLI UO Eugene Springfield member Larry Kikuta.

OLLI UO Eugene Springfield member Larry Kikuta.

How did you originally hear about the OLLI program and what about it attracted you?

I first heard of OLLI in the Register-Guard newspaper. I was aware of the LIR program from a friend so was interested in joining when I retired. The variety of subjects offered and the trips to interesting places were the primary reasons for joining.

 

What is your background? Academic? Professional? etc.

I graduated from Oregon State University in Electrical Engineering then later went back to study business in the MBA program after my service in the Air Force was completed. I worked for various high tech companies in the Bay Area then moved to Eugene with my company. My career was primarily in accounting and finance for several companies in the Bay Area, Eugene and Corvallis.

What is your favorite form of recreation?

I have several interests including birding and golfing. I also like to travel to national parks and to visit scenic and historical places here and abroad.

What is the proudest accomplishment in your life?

My proudest accomplishment was graduating as an electrical engineer. It was a tough six years but I survived the rigorous program. A close second is being commissioned in the US Air Force and working on electrical systems on space vehicles.

What prompted you to come back to learning?

My formal education was very specialized and technical. I saw OLLI as a way to learn new ideas and to explore different academic areas which I did not have time to study in school.

What is your favorite OLLI class or activity and why?

My favorite OLLI class is Understanding Science. I was required to take only chemistry and physics as an engineering student. The variety of science classes which I have taken over the past four years have been very enriching. Learning about the world, the oceans, space and time and origins of humans have been gratifying. Then, sharing of experiences by OLLI members, who have backgrounds in various scientific fields, adds to my understanding of the subject area.

Have you ever/would you ever lead an OLLI class? If yes, please tell us a little about the class.

Leading a class at OLLI—I enjoy classes at OLLI but am not a teacher.

Why do you think the program is needed in the community?

The program is needed in the community because we need to keep learning beyond the needs of an occupation. We need to expand our minds and view our world from various perspectives. We have diverse resources in our community and we need to utilize them to enrich people’s lives.

What is your vision for the future of OLLI UO?

My vision for OLLI is to increase membership each year and to increase the number and variety of courses available for our members. Learning is a lifetime career!

 

Not a member of OLLI UO? Click here for membership information.

 

OLLI Interview–Russ Hopper

OLLI Interviews, Getting to know our members one question at a time.

This week we interview OLLI UO Central Oregon member Russ Hopper. Russ joined OLLI UO in 2008.

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OLLI UO Central Oregon member Russ Hopper

OLLI UO Central Oregon member Russ Hopper

How did you originally hear about the OLLI program and what about it attracted you?

My wife and I were at a dinner party and one of the guests was talking about a program he went to.  He could not even remember the name of the group.  I started looking online with the information I had and found it.  After that I just went to a class and before you know it I was vice president of the council.

What is your background? Academic? Professional? etc.

I was a high school science teacher for thirty years.

What is your favorite form of recreation?

Hiking and gardening.  Hiking I can do year round but here in Bend the gardening season is short.

What is the proudest accomplishment in your life?

Even if it sounds trite it is raising two children to be productive and happy adults.  Especially now much of the rest of my life has been transitory.

What prompted you to come back to learning?

I have always enjoyed learning and now I can expand what I want to explore without concerning myself with keeping up professionally. I also still enjoy teaching and have been tutoring at a local high school for the last six years.  It all seems to go together for me.

What is your favorite OLLI class or activity and why?

Science and history.

Have you ever/would you ever lead an OLLI class? If yes, please tell us a little about the class.

I have on more than one occasion.  The last one was a streaming class titled ‘Global Warming’ through the free online Coursera web site.  It required extra work to add background information for participants.  I was able to use some of my chemistry background in that effort.  It was fun while doing it but not something I care to do on an ongoing basis.  Most classes take much less effort than that one did.

Why do you think the program is needed in the community?

We have many seniors retiring to Bend – as my wife and I did – looking for a connection with others with an desire to keep there mind sharp and meet new friends. Keeping our minds active helps our overall well being.

What is your vision for the future of OLLI UO?

Maybe I have a hope as much as a vision but being able to accommodate all who want to participate.

 

Not a member of OLLI UO? Click here for membership information.