High Desert Museum Tour—Nations of the Columbia River Plateau

Central Oregon—Join OLLI members Norma Montgomery and Jim and Sara Langton at the High Desert Museum for a little-known journey of the Plateau Indian Nations as they traveled from reservation confinement to the 21st century. See the process of cultural change as the Nez Perce, Umatilla, Warm Springs, Yakama, Spokane, and Colville tribes made the passage to modernity.

By Hand through Memory portrays Native Americans as active historic players whose practical efforts to retain cultural memory enabled them to retain their ethnic identity, despite adaption to a cash economy and the federal policies aimed at assimilation.

The High Desert Museum possesses a collection of approximately 29,000 objects from the Great Basin, Plateau, and Pacific Northwest territories, from historic artifacts to cultural artifacts of various Native American groups – as well as outstanding contemporary works by regional masters such as Rick Barton, Pat Courtney Gold, and Lillian Pitt.

Preregistration begins May 24; cost for non-High Desert Museum members is $8. Participants should plan to meet at the museum entrance at 9:45 a.m.

Eclipse! What’s the Big Deal About the Total Solar Eclipse on August 21?

Central Oregon—The first total solar eclipse touching the continental United States since 1979 touches down in Oregon on August 21. While the rest of the United States offers a longer duration of totality, sections of the eclipse path in Oregon offer the best weather prospects anywhere along the entire eclipse route. Join OLLI member Jim Hammond, as he discusses both lunar and solar eclipses, and explains some of the connections between different eclipses.

Included in his presentation are the various phenomena to be aware of and to be looking for, such as where the best place is to observe the eclipse. What are the safest ways the different phases can be observed? How you can photograph eclipse phenomena? How much you should charge for camping in your yard if you live within the path of totality, and should you even bother going anywhere or just watch the eclipse on TV?

The rarity of total solar eclipses and the limited areas on earth on which they can be observed make the upcoming eclipse exceptional for the United States as it will pass from coast to coast during the time of year having the best weather prospects.

Jim has a PhD in physics from the University of Colorado and first witnessed a total solar eclipse in 1970, just a few weeks before being awarded his diploma. He has traveled to witness two other total solar eclipses, including one in 2012 that took him to Australia. Over the years he has witnessed many lunar and partial solar eclipses.

Preregistration is required and opened on May 18.

Update

Due to member interest in the topic we are opening a second session of Jim Hammond’s talk:

What’s the Big Deal about the Total Solar Eclipse on August 21, 2017?
Tuesday, June 6, 1:30 p.m.
UOBC

Jim will discuss both lunar and solar eclipses, and explain some of the connections between different eclipses. Included in his presentation are the various phenomena to be aware of and to be looking for; where the best place is to observe the eclipse; what are the safe ways the different phases can be observed; how you can photograph eclipse phenomena; how much you should charge for camping in your yard if you live within the path of totality; and should you even bother going anywhere and just watch the eclipse on TV.

Preregistration is not required for this afternoon session. Members who have already registered for the morning session are welcome to attend the afternoon session. We hope this change will allow us to keep class size manageable for discussion. Contact the Academic Extension offices at 800-824-2714 or 541-728-0685 with any questions.

Field Trip to Fort Rock Basin and Fort Rock Cave

Central Oregon–Plans are currently in the works to visit Fort Rock Basin and Fort Rock Cave, the site where North America’s oldest shoes were found—dating back 9,000 years. Declared a National Historic Landmark in 1961, the trip to Fort Rock Basin is sure to be a delight. Watch your e-mail and the fliers for more details to come this month.

Facilitator: Steve Hussey

International Relations: Angela Merkel—A Leadership Profile

Eugene/Springfield–Presenter Helene-Carol Brown will cover Angela Dorothea Merkel from a biographical perspective, setting the stage for group discussion of Germany’s domestic and foreign policies including migrants and refugees, relations with the US, China, Russia, Turkey, and the European Union.

Research historian and teacher, Brown has published three historical novels. She is fascinated by the life of Merkel, one of the most important leaders in the world today.

Field Trip to Pendleton and Baker City

Central Oregon–Central Oregon member Marcia Stone and her committee are planning a three-day field trip to Pendleton and Baker City. The plan includes the Pendleton Underground Tour, tours of the Pendleton Woolen Mill and Tamastslikt Cultural Institute, with free-time visits to Hamley Saddleshop, Pendleton Center for the Arts, Heritage Station Museum, or the Pendleton Round-Up and Happy Canyon Hall of Fame. In Baker City, a tour of the Oregon Trail Cultural Center and Interpretive Center and free-time visits to the Geiser Hotel, Baker Heritage Center, the Chinese cemetery or the Leo Adler House. The return trip home may include some strategic stops in Sumpter, John Day, and Prineville.

OLLI-UO staff is requesting commitments for this special field trip by June 15. A pretrip meeting will follow with all who plan to go. Fliers and e-mail notifications will be out in early May.

Coordinators: Marcia Stone and Suzanne Butterfield

Mexican Immigration to the United States

Eugene/Springfield–Why are there so many Mexican immigrants in the United States, and why are so many of them undocumented? In this talk, Julie M. Weise, an associate professor of history at the University of Oregon, will help us answer this question. Her presentation will discuss the history of Mexican immigration to the United States, the factors that have brought so many here, and legal changes that have left so many vulnerable to deportation. She also will be happy to engage in conversation about the Trump administration’s policies towards Mexico and Mexican immigration. Weise received her PhD from Yale University and has been at UO since 2013.

Why Plato Says Democracy Leads to Tyranny—And Why You Should Worry He May Be Right

Eugene/Springfield–The Republic is a Socratic dialogue, written by Plato around 380 BCE, concerning justice, the order and character of the just city-state and the just man. It is Plato’s best-known work, and has proven to be one of the world’s most influential works of philosophy and political theory, both intellectually and historically.

In this lecture and discussion session, OLLI-UO member and retired philosophy professor, David Kolb, will concentrate on what Plato has to say about what happens when the city ruled by philosopher kings decays, falling into a series of lesser political structures ending up in a democracy which leads to tyranny. What interests Kolb is the characterization of democracy and why Plato thinks it leads to tyranny. We will examine his arguments and see if they apply to the present day or not.

Required reading: a short paper to be distributed to participants before the session.

Suggested reading: Plato, Republic, book 8 and book 9

Kitchen Chemistry

Eugene/Springfield–From making the perfect hard-boiled egg to making perfect gravy or fudge, a little knowledge of chemistry will avoid many kitchen disasters. This course assumes a bit of high school chemistry, but if your chemistry background is in the distant past, OLLIUO member and retired professor Nancy Mills also will fill in the gaps.

We will start with the chemistry of eggs, moving from how to make a hard-boiled egg that is both pretty and edible, to the use of eggs in hollandaise sauce and meringues, to the chemistry of flour (how to avoid lumpy gravy) and why one needs to knead bread, and will finish with perfect fudge.

Mills was professor emeritus at Trinity University in San Antonio. After retiring in 2015, she and her husband moved to Eugene to enjoy the outdoors.

The History of the Battle of Puebla on Cinco de Mayo

Eugene/Springfield–In the Battle of Puebla, the fate of Mexico as a democratic country and sovereign nation hung in the balance. A “bush league” Army of the Mexican Republic confronted the invading forces of the French Emperor Napoleon III, who thought the time had come to expand his empire to the Americas, while his promonarchist Mexican supporters saw the chance to destroy the fledgling Republic headed by Benito Juarez. Thus, the Battle of Puebla, on Cinco de Mayo, became one of the most significant dates in Mexican history.

OLLI-UO member Ilene O’Malley follows up on her highly successful short course on the Mexican Revolution with this single-session lecture. O’Malley has a PhD in history from the University of Michigan with a specialization in Latin America, and lived and studied in Mexico on a Fulbright Scholarship.