Tag Archives: Film Series

 Summer Documentaries

Central Oregon—Enjoy your OLLI summer with these delightful and provocative Wednesday films Wednesdays, starting July 12, 10:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m

July 12: The Galapagos Affair: Satan Comes to Eden (2013) 120 min.

July 19: Antarctica: A Year on the Ice (2013) 92 min.

Aug. 2: 13th (2016) 100 min.

Aug. 9: The Battered Bastards of Baseball (2014) 80 min.

Aug. 16: Kumare: The True Story of a False Prophet (2011) 83 min.

Aug. 23: 1971 (2014) 79 min.

Aug. 30: An Honest Liar (2014) 92 min.

Sept. 6: East Jerusalem/West Jerusalem (2014) 80 min.

Coordinator: Linda Charny

New OLLI UO Film Series “With a Song in My Heart”

Eugene/Springfield–Musicals have long been a staple of Hollywood entertainment. From the very first talkies, movies have featured song and dance, and not only did we first hear many of our most fondly-remembered songs in movies, but many cinematic dance moments are firmly fixed in our collective pop culture memories, like Gene Kelly dancing in the rain or dancing through the streets of Paris.

The story of Hollywood musicals also is the story of an evolving art form, from big Busby Berkeley production numbers, to sometimes contrived plots –often in a show-business setting – that gave song and dance men and women like Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Gene Kelly, Judy Garland, and Bing Crosby a chance to entertain their audiences, to the cinematic versions of beloved Broadway musicals with popular singers who easily made the transition from stage to screen like Howard Keeler and Barbra Streisand.

Beginning May 8, 2017, join us and your fellow film-lovers to explore this developmental arc and once again enjoy the memorable songs and the dance of Hollywood musicals, as OLLI’s Film Series Program presents “With a Song in My Heart”, 12 gems from Hollywood’s musical archives in chronological order.  Following is the schedule of films and dates (on the second and fourth Mondays of the month, except for academic holidays, at 1:30 p.m. at the UO Baker Downtown Center).

05/08/17     Gold Diggers of 1933, (1933) 1 hr. 40 min.
05/22/17     Top Hat, (1935) 1 hr. 41 min.
06/12/17     Easter Parade, (1948) 1 hr. 47 min.
06/26/17     An American in Paris, (1951) 1 hr. 53 min.
07/10/17     Singing In the Rain, (1952)1 hr. 43 min.
07/24/17     Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, (1954) 1 hr. 42 min.
08/14/17     The King and I, (1956) 2 hr. 13 min.
09/11/17     Funny Face, (1957) 1 hr. 43 min.
09/25/17     West Side Story, (1961) 2 hr. 54 min.
10/09/17     My Fair Lady, (1964) 2 hr. 50 min.
10/23/17     Funny Girl, (1968) 2 hr. 31 min.
11/13/17     All That Jazz, (1979) 2 hr. 3 min.

Note that three of these movies, “West Side Story”, “My Fair Lady”, and “Funny Girl” are quite long – nearly three hours.  We will include an intermission for these films.

See you at the movies!

Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film

Central Oregon–Tuesday, February 21, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

February’s film to watch and discuss is Great Expectations (118 minutes). Wikipedia explains this black-andwhite 1946 film as being directed by David Lean and is based on the Charles Dickens novel by the same title. The film focuses on a humble orphan who suddenly becomes a gentleman with the help of an unknown benefactor, introduced by the young Alec Guinness. This session also features a film trivia quiz.

Facilitators: Bonnie Campbell and Robb Reavill

Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film

olli-uo-understanding-and-interpreting-film-1Central Oregon–This month’s film selection is The Third Man (1949, 91 minutes), suggested and voted on by members in attendance at the first session. The Third Man is black and white film noir at its best. Based on a novel by Graham Greene, it stars Joseph Cotton, Orson Wells, and Alida Valli and takes place in WWII Vienna. A pulp fiction writer goes to Vienna to work for a friend, Harry Lime, who is supposedly killed just before he arrives. Join us as we watch and discuss this Oscar-winning top-ten list favorite!

Course Manager Sharon Dawn begins the third session of the film series by sharing her experiences in film production.

Interested in becoming a member of OLLI UO? Click here.

Meals on Reels: Food and Food Culture in Cinema

Eugene/Springfield–Ah, food! Eating may be a basic human need, but food—that’s something else. Food is expressive, and it evokes memories and emotions.

Food helps define cultures and personal identity, while the shared experience of food can bridge cultures and connect individuals together. Food is science and technique, and also art and creativity. It can be plain and comfortable, and it can be dramatic and pleasurable. Is there another element in our lives that can be such a metaphor and vehicle for the range of human emotions and experience? It is no wonder that food, the people who work with and create food and food culture have been such rich sources of storytelling in film.

We’ll bring you 12 examples of those stories in our next OLLI-UO Film Series, “Meals on Reels: Food and Food Culture in Cinema,” with Chocolat, perhaps the ultimate film about the expression of passion and conflict through food.

Come join us second and fourth Mondays for this new series. Enjoy these creative films, and reflect on the myriad ways food impacts and gives expression to our own lives. The films and their scheduled screening dates are listed below. More detailed information about the individual films is available on the OLLI-UO website.

Fall 2016

  • October 10 Chocolat
  • October 24 Waitress
  • November 14 Babette’s Feast
  • November 28 Tampopo
  • December 12 Burnt
  • December 26 Winter Holidays
  • Break– No Movie

Winter–Spring 2017

  • January 9 Mostly Martha
  • January 23 Big Night
  • February 13 Eat Drink Man Woman
  • February 27 Tortilla Soup
  • March 13 Ratatouille
  • March 27 The Hundred Foot Journey
  • April 10 Julie and Julia

Three Middle Eastern Families 

 

Three Middle Eastern Families

Eugene/Springfield–This is a three-part short course of films and discussions about three Middle Eastern families. All films are from the Middle East and were written, produced, and directed in these countries. They have won acclaim and awards both in their own countries and in the west:

Wadija-Saudi Arabia, Campfire-Israel, and The Separation-Iran. Each of the three focuses on one family and illustrates how religion affects their daily lives. Each film will be followed by guided discussions and in the final session, the discussion will compare and contrast the three with each other and with western families.

Kitty Meredith has been a member of OLLI-UO for 10 years. She has a BA in psychology and history from The University of Virginia and an MS.in conflict management from George Mason University. Kitty has participated in many OLLI discussion groups and was president of the Governing Council in 2008. She has given talks at OLLI on numerous subjects, with an emphasis on the Middle East.

Summer Documentary Film Series

 

5Central Oregon–In the June newsletter we listed the summer documentaries and described the series. Below are brief descriptions of each one. Due to the length of these films, please note that the class time is extended to 12:30 p.m.

July 6: Happy People: A Year in the Taiga, 2010 (95 minutes) Tucked away in a place known by some for its chilly and merciless nature, there is an exquisite vision of life. This documentary explores life along the River Yenisei in Russia, where the industrious inhabitants of a rural village truly live off the land. A nice follow up to our recent Russian history course.

July 27: Citizenfour, 2014 (113 minutes) This tension-fueled documentary from filmmaker Laura Poitras follows her 2013 journey to Hong Kong to meet with whistleblower Edward Snowden as he was preparing to release a wealth of classified government documents.

August 3: Cowspiracy, 2014 (90 minutes) Learn how factory farming is dominating the planet’s natural resources— and why this crisis has been largely ignored by major environmental groups.

August 10: Blackfish, 2013 (83 minutes) They’re hunted, herded, and forced to dance. Meet a 15,000-pound slave— on the edge of a psychotic break. This fascinating documentary examines the life of performing killer whale Tilikum, who caused the deaths of several people while in captivity.

August 17: Particle Fever, 2013 (99 minutes) Scientists and the God particle. They spent decades trying to find it. You might not understand; be glad they do. The creation of the Higgs boson particle, an elusive key to unlocking secrets of the universe, unfolds on camera in this landmark documentary.

August 24: Red Army, 2014 (85 minutes) Captain of the Red Army hockey team during its glory years in the 1970s and ‘80s, “Slava” Fetisov recalls the pride and constant pressure felt by the players on the squad during a turbulent political era in the Soviet Union.

August 31: The Widowmaker, 2015 (95 minutes) This controversial documentary calls into question current medical approaches to cardiac care, weighed against the effectiveness of preventive measures.

September 7: And the Oscar Goes To…, 2014 (94 minutes) Get the full star-studded story behind the little guy who has been the biggest thing in Hollywood since 1929. Featuring vintage clips and interviews with everyone from Steven Spielberg to Liza Minnelli, this captivating film traces the history of the Oscars.

Want to know more about becoming a member? Click here.

Faith and Religion in Film

Few things inspire such passion and conflict–and such meaningfulness and peace–in our lives as religion. Join us for different looks at faith and religion through the lens of the filmmaker as we start our next film series at OLLI: “Faith and Religion in Film” on April 11. During April through July, we will screen these eight movies, each with differing perspectives on the role of religion in individual lives and in communities and civilizations:

April 11

A Man For All Seasons, 1966, introduced by Craig Starr, Rated “Approved”, 120 MINS.

Cast:  Paul Scofield, Wendy Hiller, Robert Shaw, Orson Welles, Susannah York, John Hurt

Paul Scofield won a Best Actor Academy Award for his portrayal of Sir Thomas More, Lord Chancellor and Chief Minister of England under King Henry VIII of England.  As Henry breaks with the Pope and asserts his authority as head of the Church of England so he can annul his marriage to Catherine and marry Anne Boleyn, Sir Thomas walks a fine and dangerous line between his pious devotion to the Catholic Church and his political allegiance to his king.

April 25

Elmer Gantry, 1960, introduced by Howard Schuman, Rated “Approved”, 146 MINS

Cast:   Burt Lancaster, Jean Simmons, Arthur Kennedy, Dean Jagger, Shirley Jones, Patti Page

Burt Lancaster stars as a fast-talking, hard drinking salesman who convinces an earnest Evangelist lay preacher that he can be an effective preacher for her cause.  Eventually, though, his past catches up with him, with tragic results.

May 9

Amazing Grace, 2006, introduced by Andy Walcott, Rated PG, 118 MINS

Cast:  Ioan Gruffudd, Albert Finney, Michael Gambon, Benedict Cumberbatch

A powerful and inspiring true account of one devout idealist’s struggle against the British Parliament and moneyed interests to end the British transatlantic slave trade.

May 23

Going My Way, 1944, introduced by John Attig, Rated “Passed”, 126 MINS

Cast:  Bing Crosby, Barry Fitzgerald, Frank McHugh

Youthful Father Chuck O’Malley led a colorful life of sports, song, and romance before joining the Roman Catholic clergy, and when he is assigned to the parish of Father Fitzgibbon, his aging, conventional superior, O’Malley’s worldly knowledge helps him connect with a gang of kids looking for direction, handle the business details of the church-building fund, and win over Father Fitzgibbon.

June 13

The Robe, 1953, introduced by Dana Edwards, Unrated, 135 MINS

Cast:  Richard Burton, Jean Simmons, Victor Mature, Michael Rennie, Jay Robinson, Dean Jagger, Torin Thatcher, Richard Boone

An epic Hollywood depiction of the Roman Empire during the time of Jesus, as Marcellus, a Roman tribune in charge of the Roman soldiers assigned to crucify Jesus, embarks on a quest afterward to find faith and redemption in the wake of his guilt over what he has done.

June 27

The Chosen, 1981, introduced by Howard Schuman, Rated PG, 108 MINS

Cast:  Maximilian Schell, Rod Steiger, Robby Benson, Barry Miller, Ron Rifkin

This screen version of Chaim Potok’s moving novel about the importance and clash of differing traditions tells the story of two Jewish youngsters in 1944 Brooklyn – one from a very orthodox and observant family and the other from a liberal and secular one – who form a strong friendship as they deal with parental expectations and their own futures.

July 11

Doubt, 2008, introduced by Dana Edwards, Rated PG-13, 104 MINS

Cast:  Meryl Streep, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Amy Adams, Viola Davis

In a Bronx Catholic School in 1964, the winds of modern change, in the person of Father Flynn, are fiercely opposed by the iron-gloved principal, Sister Aloysius Beauvier, who believes in the power of fear-based discipline and the school’s strict customs.  When Sister James shares with Sister Aloysius her guilt-inducing suspicion that Father Flynn is spending too much time with Donald, the school’s first black student, Sister Aloysius sets off on a personal crusade to discover the truth and expel Father Flynn from the school, locking herself in a battle of wills with Father Flynn that threatens to tear apart the community with irrevocable consequences.

July 25

Jesus Christ Superstar, 1973, introduced by Craig Starr, Rated G, 108 MINS

Cast:  Ted Neeley, Carl Anderson, Yvonne Elliman, Barry Dennen, Bob Bingham, Josh Mostel

Director Norman Jewison’s screen version of Andrew Lloyd Weber’s and Tim Rice’s first rock opera tells the story of Jesus’ final six days through the troubled eyes of Judas Iscariot.

PLEASE NOTE the change in start times for our movies beginning with this series.  All movies will now start at 1:30 p.m. instead of 1:00 p.m.  (Yes, for our long-time fans, you are right that this is a return to our original start time.)

We’ll see you at the movies!


Craig Starr

 

Craig Starr is chair of the OLLI UO Eugene/Springfield film series subcommittee. He has been an OLLI member for over two years and is a “recovered” attorney, He retired over two years ago from an administrator’s position with a regional law firm, and occasionally teaches at the law school.

Film Series: “Faith and Religion in Film”

4

OLLI UO Eugene/Springfield–Few things inspire such passion and conflict–and such meaningfulness and peace–in our lives as religion.  Join us for different looks at faith and religion through the lens of the filmmaker as we start our next film series at OLLI: “Faith and Religion in Film” on April 11.  During April through July, we will screen these eight movies, each with differing perspectives on the role of religion in individual lives and in communities and civilizations:

April 11
A Man For All Seasons, 1966, introduced by Craig Starr
Rated “Approved”, 120 MINS.
Cast:  Paul Scofield, Wendy Hiller, Robert Shaw, Orson Welles, Susannah York, John Hurt
Paul Scofield won a Best Actor Academy Award for his portrayal of Sir Thomas More, Lord Chancellor and Chief Minister of England under King Henry VIII of England. As Henry breaks with the Pope and asserts his authority as head of the Church of England so he can annul his marriage to Catherine and marry Anne Boleyn, Sir Thomas walks a fine and dangerous line between his pious devotion to the Catholic Church and his political allegiance to his king.

April 25
Elmer Gantry, 1960, introduced by Howard Schuman
Rated “Approved”, 146 MINS
Cast:   Burt Lancaster, Jean Simmons, Arthur Kennedy, Dean Jagger, Shirley Jones, Patti Page
Burt Lancaster stars as a fast-talking, hard drinking salesman who convinces an earnest Evangelist lay preacher that he can be an effective preacher for her cause.  Eventually, though, his past catches up with him, with tragic results.

May 9
Amazing Grace, 2006, introduced by Andy Walcott
Rated PG, 118 MINS
Cast:  Ioan Gruffudd, Albert Finney, Michael Gambon, Benedict Cumberbatch
A powerful and inspiring true account of one devout idealist’s struggle against the British Parliament and moneyed interests to end the British transatlantic slave trade.

May 23
Going My Way, 1944, introduced by John Attig
Rated “Passed”, 126 MINS
Cast:  Bing Crosby, Barry Fitzgerald, Frank McHugh
Youthful Father Chuck O’Malley led a colorful life of sports, song, and romance before joining the Roman Catholic clergy, and when he is assigned to the parish of Father Fitzgibbon, his aging, conventional superior, O’Malley’s worldly knowledge helps him connect with a gang of kids looking for direction, handle the business details of the church-building fund, and win over Father Fitzgibbon.

June 13
The Robe, 1953, introduced by Dana Edwards
Unrated, 135 MINS
Cast:  Richard Burton, Jean Simmons, Victor Mature, Michael Rennie, Jay Robinson, Dean Jagger, Torin Thatcher, Richard Boone
An epic Hollywood depiction of the Roman Empire during the time of Jesus, as Marcellus, a Roman tribune in charge of the Roman soldiers assigned to crucify Jesus, embarks on a quest afterward to find faith and redemption in the wake of his guilt over what he has done.

June 27
The Chosen, 1981, introduced by Howard Schuman
Rated PG, 108 MINS
Cast:  Maximilian Schell, Rod Steiger, Robby Benson, Barry Miller, Ron Rifkin
This screen version of Chaim Potok’s moving novel about the importance and clash of differing traditions tells the story of two Jewish youngsters in 1944 Brooklyn – one from a very orthodox and observant family and the other from a liberal and secular one – who form a strong friendship as they deal with parental expectations and their own futures.

July 11
Doubt, 2008, introduced by Dana Edwards
Rated PG-13, 104 MINS
Cast:  Meryl Streep, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Amy Adams, Viola Davis
In a Bronx Catholic School in 1964, the winds of modern change, in the person of Father Flynn, are fiercely opposed by the iron-gloved principal, Sister Aloysius Beauvier, who believes in the power of fear-based discipline and the school’s strict customs.  When Sister James shares with Sister Aloysius her guilt-inducing suspicion that Father Flynn is spending too much time with Donald, the school’s first black student, Sister Aloysius sets off on a personal crusade to discover the truth and expel Father Flynn from the school, locking herself in a battle of wills with Father Flynn that threatens to tear apart the community with irrevocable consequences.

July 25
Jesus Christ Superstar, 1973, introduced by Craig Starr
Rated G, 108 MINS
Cast:  Ted Neeley, Carl Anderson, Yvonne Elliman, Barry Dennen, Bob Bingham, Josh Mostel
Director Norman Jewison’s screen version of Andrew Lloyd Weber’s and Tim Rice’s first rock opera tells the story of Jesus’ final six days through the troubled eyes of Judas Iscariot.

PLEASE NOTE the change in start times for our movies beginning with this series.  All movies will now start at 1:30 p.m. instead of 1:00 p.m.  (Yes, for our long-time fans, you are right that this is a return to our original start time.)

We’ll see you at the movies!

Not a member? Join OLLI UO today.


Craig Starr

 

Craig Starr is chairperson of the OLLI UO Eugene/Springfield film series committee. He has been an OLLI member for over two years and is a “recovered” attorney, He retired over two years ago from an administrator’s position with a regional law firm, and occasionally teaches at the law school.

Central Oregon Summer Documentary Filmfest

OLLI UO Summer 2015 Documentary Filmfest

There’s Sundance, Telluride, the Bend Film Festival—but nothing beats the OLLI Central Oregon Summer Documentary Film Series.

Get ready to laugh and to cry. Our Wednesday morning summer documentary program will show eight films that will in turn amuse, anger, entertain and educate, and offer a great opportunity for stimulating discussion.

This summer’s films include:

July 8     Traces of the Trade: A Story of the Deep North, 2008, 86 min.
Filmmaker Katrina Browne discovers that her New England ancestors were the largest slave-trading family in U.S. history. She retraces the Triangle Trade and gains powerful new perspectives on the black/white divide.

July 15     Alive Inside: A Story of Music and Memory, 2014, 78 min.
This moving documentary follows social worker Dan Cohen as he uses music to unlock the memory of nursing home patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Aided by well-known neurologist Oliver Sacks, Cohen aims to transform the quality of life for the afflicted.

July 22     Dirty Wars, 2013, 86 min. A 2014
Oscar nominee, the film follows investigative reporter Jeremy Scahill as he explores America’s controversial methods of mitigating terror threats around the globe.

Aug. 12     Commune, 2005, 95 min.
In 1968, Elsa and Richard Marley founded an alternative living community in the remote Northern California wilderness. Through archival footage and interviews with former residents, the film explores the problems and realities of communal living in a community that endured FBI harassment, cult leadership, and more.

Aug. 19     The Gatekeepers, 2012, 95 min.
Meet six leaders of the Shin Bet, Israel’s secret service, which has dealt with conflict amid the quest for peace for nearly 50 years. For the first time, they discuss the truths and consequences of their counter-terrorism mission.

Aug. 26     Encounters at the End of the World, 2007, 100 min.
Filmmaker Werner Herzog takes you on a wild journey to the South Pole— from the National Science Foundation’s headquarters on Ross Island to some of Antarctica’s most remote and dangerous terrain.

Sept. 2     The Winding Stream, 2014, 90 min.
Story of the musical Carter Family and their impact on music.

Sept. 9      Man on A Wire, 2008, 94 min.
Phillippe Petit captured the world’s attention in 1974 when he walked across a high wire between New York’s Twin Towers. This film explores the preparations, the event, and its aftermath.

 

Not a member of OLLI UO? Click here for membership information.